Home arrow B. John Burns Blog arrow There is Life on Mars, the Supreme Court Rules
There is Life on Mars, the Supreme Court Rules
By B John Burns
June 25, 2014

In today’s decision in Riley v. California, a unanimous Supreme Court went way beyond simply holding that law enforcement must obtain a warrant to examine the contents of a cell phone taken during a search incident to arrest.

Cell phones, Chief Justice Roberts announced, “are now such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that the proverbial visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy.”

Roberts’ statement is an extraordinarily Earth-shaking pronouncement, even from this activist Court.  Scientists have debated from the beginning of time whether (1) the climate on Mars could support life, and (2) whether there is, or has been in its history, any life on the Red Planet (in the form of single-celled organisms).  I am unaware of any prior written decision of the Court taking a position on the subject, especially speculating that life on Mars has evolved to a point that Martians have traveled to Earth.

I’m still shaking.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
quote
bold
italicize
underline
strike
url
image
quote
quote
smaller | bigger

security code
Write the displayed characters


busy
 
< Prev   Next >

Criminal Procedure 4A

By B.John Burns 

This reference offers a comprehensive analysis of Iowa criminal procedure. It analyzes criminal procedure, including pre-trial, trial, sentencing, and post-conviction procedure. Provides a comprehensive manual covering all procedural aspects of an Iowa criminal case, from the time you are first engaged to represent a suspected or charged individual, through the final steps of a criminal appeal or state or federal post conviction relief proceeding. Separate divisions review evidentiary issues in criminal trials, constitutional provisions affecting criminal cases, and the representation of inmates in prison litigation.


Buy Book

Who's Online

Syndicate

© 2017 Iowa Public Defender